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April 29, 2011

Lincoln Center Begins the Final Stages of Construction Project with the Installation of President's Bridge

Lincoln Center News

April 29, 2011

Press Contact:

Eva Chien, 212.875.5049

[email protected]



LINCOLN CENTER BEGINS THE FINAL STAGES OF CONSTRUCTION PROJECT WITH THE INSTALLATION OF PRESIDENT’S BRIDGE



April 29, 2011, New York, NY -- Lincoln Center begins the final stages of a multi-year $1.2 billion construction project with the installation of President’s Bridge across 65th Street, Lincoln Center’s Avenue of the Arts, which connects for students, patrons, and international visitors the Metropolitan Opera House, Avery Fisher Hall (home of the New York Philharmonic), the Koch Theater (home of New York City Ballet and New York City Opera), and Lincoln Center Theater with The Juilliard School, the School of American Ballet, the Film Society of Lincoln Center, and Alice Tully Hall.


The bridge will be completed and open to the public in late summer/early fall, following the opening of the Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center this June, as well as the installation of the final 5 InfoBlades completing Lincoln Center’s new state-of-the-art multi-channel digital InfoScape and Lincoln Center Theater’s third theater opening early 2012.


The ADA accessible pedestrian bridge, spanning 80 feet by 10 feet wide will connect the outer lobby of the Rose Building to Hearst Plaza (which houses Barclays Grove, Illumination Lawn, and the acclaimed LINCOLN restaurant), providing a safe alternate crossing for visitors of all ages and easing the passage between the northern and southern campuses of Lincoln Center.


The President’s Bridge is a stressed-skin steel structure that intersects with the travertine base of Lincoln Center Theater as lightly as possible. The structural plate of the bridge carries loads in combination with the internal steel framework, which allows the bridge be extraordinarily strong while having a remarkably thin profile. Prior to landing on LCT, the walking surface and primary structure split, allowing the walking surface to slip past the base travertine and intersect with the plaza. The expression of this intersection is a clean slice the width of the bridge, thus removing the smallest length of balustrade possible. The primary structural beam rests in a recessed pocket in the travertine base wall which is positioned according to the logic of the existing stone coursing. The glass elements of the bridge are a continuation of the glass that starts at the Juilliard/Tully pedestrian walk.


Lincoln Center is the world’s leading performing arts complex, representing the highest standards of excellence in opera, symphonic and chamber music, theater, dance, film, and arts education. Its 12 resident organizations – The Chamber Music Society, The Film Society of Lincoln Center, Jazz at Lincoln Center, The Juilliard School, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, Lincoln Center Theater, The Metropolitan Opera, New York City Ballet, New York City Opera, New York Philharmonic, New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, and School of American Ballet – welcome 5 million visitors each year.


After five decades of artistic excellence and service to its community, the nation and the world, Lincoln Center began a major transformation initiative to fully modernize its concert halls and public spaces, renew its 16-acre campus to embrace the surrounding cityscape, and reinforce its vitality for decades to come. The 65th Street Project, designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro in association with FX Fowle Architects, has already resulted in a more animated and transparent streetscape with the removal of the Paul Milstein Plaza and bridge and the shearing away of the easternmost elements of Alice Tully Hall and the Juilliard School, both of which are newly transformed and dramatically expanded. Diller Scofidio + Renfro, in association with Beyer Blinder Belle, also redesigned Lincoln Center’s iconic Josie Robertson Plaza along Columbus Avenue featuring a spectacular new entrance and technologically enhanced Revson Fountain.

High Resolution Images Return to Top

The President's Bridge
Caption: Named in honor of Reynold Levy
Photo Credit: Mark Bussell
Size: 3968x2232
The President's Bridge
Caption: Named in honor of Reynold Levy
Photo Credit: Mark Bussell
Size: 3968x2232

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